Why Read MINDING THE MUSE, A Handbook for Painters, Composers, Writers, and Other Creators by Priscilla Long, if you have read The Artist’s Way by Julia Cameron, and such?

Minding the Muse, A Handbook for Painters, Composers, Writers, and Other Creators by Priscilla Long, Coffeetown Press, Seattle, 2016 Priscilla Long’s slim handbook for artists suggests ways to refl…

Source: Why Read MINDING THE MUSE, A Handbook for Painters, Composers, Writers, and Other Creators by Priscilla Long, if you have read The Artist’s Way by Julia Cameron, and such?

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GREEN LAKE: A classic walk in Seattle

Seattle has salt water and fresh water parks; wild shorelines, and tame.

Have you walked (or biked or run or roller-bladed) around Green Lake?

Thousands of years ago a glacier carved what is now Green Lake. Green Lake may be fresh water and have a tame paved trail, but it has water to swim in and stare at, and trees and lawns and playgrounds.

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It is flat. It is under three miles.  These are some of the views.

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You can boat.

On the shore across the lake is the home of Seattle Public Theater. The current show is a thriller, On Clover Road by Steven Dietz.

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You can bird watch. Some persons fish.

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Information including maps, photos, amenities.

IF YOU LIVE OUTSIDE OF SEATTLE OR CAN’T GET TO GREEN LAKE,  VISIT FRESH WATER NEAR YOU (e.g. a river, a pond, a lake). TELL US WHERE YOU VISITED IN THE COMMENTS SECTION. WE WOULD LOVE TO SEE YOUR PHOTOS TOO.

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First Thursday, and beyond: Sights to see in Seattle soon

The First Thursday of each month is a free art day in Seattle. Museums are free. Here is a huge list! Did you know we had this many museums in the area?

Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture
Free – first Thursday of every month.
Bellevue Arts Museum
Free – first Friday of every month.
Center for Wooden Boats
Free – always.
Duwamish Longhouse & Cultural Center
Free – always.
Frye Art Museum
Free – always.
Henry Art Gallery
Free – first Thursday of every month, always students.
Imagine Children’s Museum
Free – third Friday of every month 5:30-9pm, half price admission every Thursday 3-5pm.
Klondike Gold Rush Museum
Free – always.
Living Computer Museum
Free – first Thursday of every month 5-8pm.
Loghouse Museum
Pay What You Wish – always
Museum of Flight
Free – first Thursday of every month 5-9pm.
Museum of Glass
Free – third Thursday of every month 5-8pm, every Sunday for college students with ID.
Museum of History and Industry
Free – first Thursday of every month.
Nordic Heritage Museum
Free – first Thursday of every month.
Northwest African American Museum
Free – first Thursday of every month.
Northwest Railway Museum
Free – always.
Northwest Seaport Maritime Heritage Center
Free – first Thursday of every month.
Olympic Sculpture Park
Free – always.
Seattle Art Museum Downtown
Free – first Thursday of every month, first Friday ages 62 and over.
Seattle Asian Art Museum
Free – first Thursday and Saturday and second Thursday 5-9pm of every month, first Friday ages 62 and over.
Seattle Children’s Museum
Pay What You Wish – every weekday 4-5pm.
Seattle Public Library Museum Pass
Free – always, Seattle Public Library card holders reserve and print free admission tickets to Seattle museums.
Washington Park Arboretum
Free – always.
Wing Luke Asian Museum
Free – first Thursday of every month.

Galleries in Pioneer Square open new shows. Many serve drinks and snacks too. The Alliance for Pioneer Square has a terrific website with maps, dates and this history:

“Did you know First Thursday in Pioneer Square was the first Art Walk in the USA? In 1981, a group of Pioneer Square art dealers printed handout maps and on the first Thursday of the month painted footprints on the sidewalk outside their galleries. First Thursday soon evolved into a beloved fixture on the local arts calendar.

Today, First Thursday takes place each month in Seattle’s historic Pioneer Square neighborhood, from 6 pm to 8 pm, when leading art galleries throw open their doors to introduce their new exhibitions and artists.

The Art Walk in Pioneer Square is enhanced by the dozens of public art installations that can be found when walking between galleries. From the historic Native American Totem Poles in Occidental and Pioneer Square parks to the bright red “Sentinels” on guard outside the new Fire Station 10.”

First Thursday also has a Face Book page.

 

IF YOU LIVE OUTSIDE OF SEATTLE OR CANNOT MAKE IT TO FIRST THURSDAY EVENTS, VISIT AN ART GALLERY NEAR YOU. TELL US WHERE YOU WENT IN THE COMMENTS!

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Tree Walks: (Seattle) Sights to See at any time

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Northern Red Oak, Hiawatha Park, West Seattle

Take a tree walk in your neighborhood or at the closest park.

Over the weekend I took a walk guided by Tree Ambassador Al from reLeaf, a division of SDOT. All the photos are from that walk. You can use a map and guide (an example)  from Seattle’s reLeaf program for your tree walk, or take one of their guided walks. From this page you can download a map from your own neighborhood.

 

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Red Pines (state tree of Minnesota), Hiawatha Park, West Seattle

Look for native trees such as Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and black hawthorn (Crataegus douglasii). Native trees are from here.

Look for naturalized trees such as box elder (Acer negundo) and English laurel (Prunus laurocerasus). Naturalized trees are from elsewhere but now plant themselves.

Look for exotic trees such as the pitch pine (Pinus rigida). Exotic trees are imported.

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Pitch Pine, Hiawatha Park, West Seattle

We would love to see your photos. Please, tell us where you walked and what trees you saw.

 

Resources for locating and/or identifying trees in the Seattle area:

*The next free guided tree walk (from the SDOT webpage):

“Ballard Salmon Tree Walk, Saturday, October 1st, 10-11 am
Meet at the corner of 11th Ave. NW and NW 58th St. [map]   RSVP here

Come learn about the beautiful trees of Ballard with Tree Ambassadors Bob & Erin as we walk through a neighborhood that once served as a salmon spawning stream. While the forest has changed significantly since then, you will still find the trees just as captivating, and Ballard all the more enchanting.”

*Trees of Seattle by Arthur Lee Jacobson (Sasquatch Books, 1989)

*King County’s extensive NATIVE plant guide.

*The city of Seattle Department of Planning and Development’s identification sheet of Seattle trees which “may qualify for protection measures.”

*Jake Ellison’s photo gallery of impressive Seattle trees with their locations.

*Download the free app, Tree Walk /Seattle for Seattle street tree maps with names.

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London Planetree at Hiawatha Park, West Seattle

Do you like walking? Here are more ideas in the Seattle area from Feet First.

IF YOU LIVE OUTSIDE OF SEATTLE OR CANNOT MAKE IT TO A TREE WALK, PICK UP A TREE GUIDE AT YOUR LIBRARY, AND WALK AROUND YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD TO LOOK AT TREES. TELL US WHERE YOU WENT IN THE COMMENTS!

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SOUTH SEATTLE COLLEGE ARBORETUM: Seattle sights to see soon

Did you know South Seattle College had an arboretum? It is small and lovely and free. The college has a master gardener program. You may bump into some very informative people as you wander the pretty paths. It has an ambitious Chinese garden (The Seattle Chinese Garden) with a wonderful fish sculpture and a peony garden. From the hilltop one can look north at downtown Seattle. The arboretum is open dawn to dusk.

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(Photo courtesy of The American Conifer Society)

A walking map of the arboretum.

Directions to the arboretum.

From the South Seattle College website:

The purpose of the Arboretum:

  • To provide an outdoor laboratory for landscape students
  • To provide an outdoor classroom for the entire college
  • To provide a garden sanctuary for the community-at-large

Highlights:

  • The Arboretum’s Coenosium Rock Garden contains one of the best collections of dwarf conifers in the United States
  • The Coenosium Rock Garden was inducted into the Gardens for Peace program in 2010
  • The Landscape Horticulture facilities, including the Arboretum, were awarded a “5-star” Environstar rating in 2010
  • The Arboretum became a National Wildlife Federation Urban Wildlife Sanctuary in 2012
  • The Arboretum has been “pesticide-free” since 2008
  • Articles about the Arboretum have appeared in the Seattle Times, The News Tribune, Washington Park Arboretum Bulletin, Conifer Quarterly, and Crosscut.

Gorgeous pictures and a similar article to this!

Article about the Peace Garden from The West Seattle Blog.

IF YOU LIVE OUTSIDE OF SEATTLE OR CANNOT MAKE IT TO THIS ARBORETUM, VISIT A GARDEN, CONSERVATORY, OR ARBORETUM NEAR YOU. TELL US WHERE YOU WENT IN THE COMMENTS!

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Seattle Sights to See soon: WASHINGTON PARK ARBORETUM

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It’s free to walk the many trails of the enormous arboretum in any season. The park is open dawn to dusk. Be ready for some mud, winter and spring.

You can even visit Lake Washington. Take the Foster Island path. From its bridges you may see turtles and water birds, and all kinds of marsh plants.

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There is a fenced Japanese garden for which there is a fee. It is fun to buy fish food and feed the giant koi lurking in the ponds.

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Map for directions.

Trail map, plant collection information, and history.

Foster Island information from Washington Trails Association.

You don’t live in the Seattle area? Does your area have a botanical garden?

IF YOU LIVE OUTSIDE OF SEATTLE OR CANNOT MAKE IT TO THIS ARBORETUM, VISIT A GARDEN, CONSERVATORY, OR ARBORETUM NEAR YOU. TELL US WHERE YOU WENT IN THE COMMENTS!

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The Weird Rules of Adjective Order

Native speakers may not know these rules exist. We have learned them by ear.

English language learners will sound more fluent if they practice this adjective order:

  1. place (first, last, next …)
  2. quantity or number
  3. opinion/quality (general before specific)
  4. size, length, height …
  5. temperature
  6. age
  7. condition (spotless, shiny, new …)
  8. shape
  9. color
  10. origin/nationality
  11. material (wood, paper, wool …)
  12. purpose

For example, we say, “I wore my last clean white cotton shirt.” (Place, condition, color, material.)

To Americans, “I wore my clean last cotton white shirt,” sounds like nonsense.

For more information, look at this conversation.

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